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Review

Marushin Super Blackhawk (8mm)
  • Manufacturer 
     Marushin
  • Model 
     Super Blackhawk
  • Capacity 
     6 rds
  • Weight 
     1040 g
  • Power 
     280 fps (0.34g)
  • Power Source 
     HFC134a
  • Blowback 
     No
  • Hop-up 
     Adjustable
  • Shooting Mode 
     Single
  • Construction 
     HW plastic and metal

Pros

-Realistic operation and feel
-Heavy weight and detailing
-Unique look
 

Cons

-Limited capacity (6 shots)
 

Verdict

For revolver aficionados Marushin are definitely worthy to look at. While the power-player may still opt for the TM Hi-Capa as their sidearm, the Marushin revolvers provide a wholly different experience, and look much better in a display cabinet too!

 

A quite fitting weapon of choice for lonely riders in trench coats is a single action revolver. The development of those didn't stop in the old west, but new designs were made as recently as the (19)50's, and they are still manufactured. Marushin makes some quite refined revolvers for the serious collectors, but one should not think these are useless in a skirmish either! We are pleased to present to you the Marushin Super Blackhawk series in our closer look at these six-shooters.

The real Sturm Ruger Blackhawk revolver series have been produced since 1955, and capitalized on the popularity of western style weapons. Their adjustable and otherwise improved sights and credited accuracy makes them viable for serious target shooting and even silhuette shooting and not just a novelty item.

The front sight is serrated to reduce reflections and provide a sharp sight picture.
The rear sight is adjustable for windage and elevation. It is nicely fitted into the frame to fit the overall shape and look.
The detailing and finish is very nice down to the markings. Numerous metal parts include the grip frame, hammer and trigger. The cylinder shaft and detent pin are both steel.

Marushin makes four replicas of the Super Blackhawk, consisting of two barrel lengths and two color options. All of these are HeavyWeight models, which means that metal powder has been mixed into the plastic to increase weight and produce a cool feeling. The grip frame is metal, as are the trigger, hammer, sights and other detail parts. The finishing method is immensely good looking, with the black parts having a very smooth matte surface, while the silver finish on the silver models is even more beautiful with a very metallic gloss. These represent the highest level of finishing plastic to look like metal.

The models include:

  • Marushin Super Blackhawk Maxi 7.5 inch Black
  • Marushin Super Blackhawk Maxi 7.5 inch Silver
  • Marushin Super Blackhawk Maxi 10.5 inch Black
  • Marushin Super Blackhawk Maxi 10.5 inch Silver

    A 8mm BB and 6mm BB in a size comparison. The next size up would be a golfball!
    The cylinder can be removed exactly like on the real thing.
    The inner barrel remains deep inside the muzzle, and the outer barrel has mock rifling for an even nicer look even from the front. Never look into the barrel though!

    The operation method is quite realistic. Apart from loading gas into a tank inside the grip, the operation procedure is precisely the same as with the real one. Marushin has replicated the new model from 1973, which introduced a transfer bar mechanism, allowing to load all six chambers with a cartridge. With the older single action revolvers, the user would have to half-cock the hammer and open the loading gate, load one cartridge in, skip one chamber, and then insert four more cartridges. After this the user would close the gate, fully cock the hammer and then lower it on the empty chamber. With the new model, you simply open the loading gate to allow the cylinder to turn, and load all chambers - it is not necessary to leave the chamber below the hammer empty, because of the transfer bar. The Marushin Super Blackhawk can be decocked realistically.

    The gas charging valve is hidden from curious looks deep inside the metallic grip frame.
    The hop-up adjustment is also made with regards to the look, and doesn't spoil the feeling.
    The 10.5" black model and 7.5" glossy silver. A beautiful couple indeed!

    To our surprise, the barrel length didn't make much of a difference in the muzzle velocity of these revolvers. It may be that the 7.5" barrel is long enough to make efficient use of the gas charge, but in any case the extre three inches didn't show a huge boost in the velocity. This is good news for people who are yearning for power, but prefer the look of the shorter model.

    A little known fact is that Marushin has a special clause in Japan for manufacturing 8mm replicas with a muzzle energy below 1.64 Joules, while guns that shoot 6mm BBs are strictly limited to 0.98J. Game organizers should also take this into account when defining energy limits, because an 8mm BB is equally safe for gaming use even if the energy is higher.

    While a pistol with a capacity of only six may not be the most practical skirmish tool, gas powered revolvers are seen from time to time in the skirmish fields as well. They are notorious for being powerful, and their users have a reputation of knowing how to use their special tool to maximize the effect. Among non-blowback gas guns, revolvers are the most realistic models because the real ones don't have a moving slide either. The use of shells adds even more to this, and extra shells on a belt or bandolieer is a definite cherry on top of a street-credible kit.

    The cartridges are inserted one by one through the loading gate. No swing-open cylinder in these old designs!
    An ejector rod is provided for unloading. While real casings swell from the pressure and requires an ejector, the Marushin shells slide out on their own weight.

    The Marushin Blackhawks have a detachable cylinder, and playing around with the various functions is a great past-time for those Sunday afternoons when you put on some classical music in the background and forget what you have been doing from Monday to Friday. The disassembly can be done in five seconds by pushing in the detent pin on the left side, sliding the cylinder shaft out from the front and pushing the cylinder to the right out of the frame.

    All in all these models can not really be faulted for the low capacity and single action trigger, because their real counterparts are built like that. The performance is quite decent and the Marushin Super Blackhawks look great on the outside as well, so if you're looking for an airsoft-rendition of a single action revolver, you could do a lot worse than these!