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Review

Inokatsu MAG58
  • Manufacturer 
     RedWolf Custom Guns
  • Model 
     MAG58 Steel version
  • Capacity 
     1300 rds
  • Weight 
     12,000 g
  • Power 
     400 fps
  • Motor 
     Systema Torque Up
  • Hop-up 
     Adjustable
  • Battery 
     11.1V Lithium
  • Shooting Mode 
     Full Auto
  • Construction 
     All steel + Wood and Aluminum

Pros

  • Possibly the most realistic GPMG around
  • Quick-change spring
  • Rock-solid CNC-machined gearbox
  • Heavy!
  •  

    Cons

  • Heavy!
  •  

    Verdict

    Make no mistake: If you need a machine gun for a modern or recent historical loadout, the MAG58 or M240B is your choice!

     

    What is the hottest machine gun on the block? No, it's not the 5.56 mouse-gun SAW. Look out for the 7.62 General Purpose Machine Gun from Belgium, the MAG58! Adopted with some modifications by the US armed forces under the moniker M240B, this machine gun is a must-have for the support gunners out there. WARNING: It's heavy!

    Machine guns may be a bit of a niche in Airsoft, and there haven't been many options manufactured in the late 90's and early new millennia. If you wanted to be a gunner back then, your best bet was to get a second hand classic machine gun such as Asahi with an external air rig, or get an electric TOP - which honestly don't have the highest level of reliability seen in electric guns. However, during recent years we've seen some very good support weapons with solid construction and a proven AEG mechanism cycling inside, among those the Inokatsu M60 series. If the M60 is called the "Pig", that must make the MAG 58 a warthog then! It serves a cosmic justice that this model was reproduced as an airsoft model.

    THE FN MAG 58

    The MAG 58 is a belt-fed air-cooled machine gun, firing 7.62 NATO caliber ammo at 650-1000 rounds per minute. The rate of fire at the lower end and heavy weight make it easy to control, and the immense reliability has made it a very trusted weapon among troops in the field. It is in use by US armed forces as M240, and a variant called the M240B features an additional rail and hydraulic buffer to improve the combat-effectiveness and versatility further. For more thorough articles on these real weapons, please click here, here and here. Links will open in new windows, but users of Firefox or Safari can simply open them in new tabs for later reading.

    While the size and heft don't make it a handy CQB-weapon, it can still hold a position quite well.
    The feeding tube and wiring don't necessarily have to look bad. If you want even neater looks underneath, you can camo the wire.
    Fold the last cartridge on top of the belt to keep the belt from slipping from underneath the cover. Hop-up is adjusted here.

    THE TRIUMPH OF STEEL

    If you like your airsoft guns to be heavy enough to make skinny guys fall over from the weight, accept no substitute for steel. Not only is it more weighty, but steel also has this nice little thing to it called strength, which means that you can handle the weapon as if it was the real thing. No more snapping pot-metal or bending aluminum when you go prone in a hurry!

    The RWC MAG 58 and M240B are based on Inokatsu kits with our own selection of premium quality internal parts from Systema and Deep Fire to provide reliable action.

    These models are shipped in a rather small box to save volumetric space in shipping, so the first thing to do is to put the main pieces together. The assembly process is simply the dismantling reversed in the same order. The gearbox will already be inside the receiver, so you simply attach the stock by sliding it down in the slots in the rear of the receiver. You should attach the stock before attaching the grip, and when disassembling the grip should be removed first: If the gearbox is moved when the grip is attached, the firing sear can shear off the micro switch contact, which will require the switch to be replaced.

    After attaching the stock and grip, the weapon just needs a barrel to look whole. It is attached from the front by pulling it into the receiver, and turning the carrying handle about 45 to the right. You will hear the ratchet lock click a few times: There's no need to tighten the outer barrel any further. To lift the carrying handle back up for carrying the machine gun, simply tug the release lever conveniently at the reach of your index finger.

    Dismantling starts by removal of the feeding device.
    Next you remove the barrel. Push the button on the left and it'll be light.
    The grip should be removed next to avoid potential damage to the micro switch.

    Of course no support weapon is complete without at least a belt hanging from the feed tray to put the cherry on top of the looks that scream: "I mean business!", but for actual use you will want to attach the feeding device as well. While attaching the feeding device isn't the simple half-second *click* as with an M4, adding BBs to the magazine doesn't require you to remove it from the weapon, and it is automatically wound by a dedicated motor when you shoot.

    The nylon ammo bag is attached to a metal attachment plate on the left side of the weapon, and it contains a cardboard ammo box within. The wiring is connected to the red leads coming from the ejection port, and the steel coil feed tube goes in from the same opening below the receiver. Some gun gray coating or paint will help to camouflage these from curious eyes, even though they are below the weapon quite concealed to begin with.

    GEARBOX

    Removing the grip and stock allows you to slide out a solid brick of aluminum out from the rear of the receiver. While gearboxes are normally shaped quite accurately to fit inside various assault rifles and submachine guns, this has not been a concern with this machine gun of a larger caliber. Making the gearbox into a rectangular beast also means that the wall thickness is immense, and there are no "cylinder windows" on the sides to create weak spots. We dare to say that this box is indestructible with any spring! (Of course it's another question if suitable internals would be available to drive a spring that strong...)

    Being as these are built in-house by RedWolf technicians, the contents of the gearbox have been carefully selected and installed to ensure reliable high performance. The pneumatics are all Systema, with the compression checked on all O-rings to prevent leaks. The drive train consists of a Systema Torque Up motor, followed by an all steel Systema Torque Up gear set, and the final mechanical part is a Deep Fire piston with all metal teeth. The gearbox only allows to use 6 mm bushings, so we went for the solid ones to make it bomb-proof. This setup allows you to use a high voltage battery for high rate of fire, but also provides torque if you wish to have your weapon shoot harder. You can simply change the spring and battery to your liking!

    The stock comes off upwards after pressing this latch.
    The weapon dismantled into the main components. No tools required, and it goes into a really small space!
    The beefy brick of aluminum billet is the gearbox, only machined inside to make room for parts. Rock solid with a quick change spring!

    Who would want such a monster of an airsoft gun? We don't know who the support gunners are, but if you're one and looking for a 7.62 machine gun replica, you will not be disappointed with these models. With premium finish, details and weight and the best money can buy for internals, you can't really go wrong with the RWC MAG 58 or M240B Steel Versions.

    RedWolf