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Review

Beretta M9
  • Manufacturer 
     Tokyo Marui
  • Model 
     TM EBB Beretta M9 (Black)
  • Capacity 
     15
  • Weight 
     350
  • Power 
     190
  • Motor 
     
  • Hop-up 
     
  • Battery 
     4 AAA alkaline batteries
  • Shooting Mode 
     Semi
  • Construction 
     

Pros

 

Cons

 

Verdict

 

Beretta M9 It's finally here! The electric blowback pistol from Marui finally made it's debut last week and has proved an instant hit amongst budget minded airsoft enthusiasts. The long awaited technology promised to provide a reliable source of power and blowback performance in a regular sized pistol package. No more gas leaks and no more loss of power due to the cooling down of gas. We are once again impressed by the engineering finesse of Marui. But did we finally get what we have been been hoping for? Almost. The M9 is finally crafted and the finishing is top notch, with the slide finished in non-reflective matte black that looks very metallic. The lower body is constructed of high quality ABS that is on par with Marui's other blowback pistols. The authentic manufacturers insignia adorns the grips while "US 9mm M9 Military" graces the good looking slide. None of the switches and levers actually move and are molded into the gun. The only gripe we have is that the disassembly lever and the safety located on the right of the slide is a little too obviously fake. The slide lock lever, magazine release, and safety of the right side of the slide look fairly decent and at first glance could be mistaken for functional moveable pieces.

Picking up the M9 proved to be a slight disappointment since it is extremely light weight and is no heavier than a spring pistol. Putting weight aside though, the M9 is very real and looks every bit as good as Marui's spring pistols. The only tell-tale sign is the latch on the butt of the gun which opens up to allow the installation of 4 AAA batteries; the center-piece of this new pistol. We found that Energizer batteries worked best and Duracell batteries did not carry enough juice to provide crisp blowback. If you have rechargeable Nickel Cadium batteries, then all the better; we popped a set in and blowback was very fast. One set of fresh batteries will provide approximately a hundred shots.

As the batteries wear down, the blowback action is noticeably slowed to the point it's almost laughable! Since the batteries take up the majority of space in the butt of the gun, the M9 is forced to use a stick type magazine that holds 15 rounds. The stick type magazine is removed by simply pulling it out. The magazine release button serves no function, unlike the M9's spring counterpart. BB's are loaded by simply pushing them into the top of the magazine. The magazine itself is constructed of dark see-through plastic which allows you to check how many rounds you have left at any time. One annoying thing though is that everytime you pull the magazine out before the gun is emptied, a BB always free falls out of the magazine well. Shooting the M9 is quite an interesting experience.

Readers comparing the electric M9 to a spring gun will be quite happy with the semi-automatic nature and you can squeeze rounds off fairly quickly, though not as quickly as you can pull the trigger. If you try to squeeze the trigger repeatedly fast enough, you can outpace the slide cycle and get less than what you had hoped. While the M9 doesn't have a normal safety, it does provide an alternative in the form of a switch located underneath the trigger guard. To fire the gun, you need to squeeze the safety lever and the trigger at the same time. As the gun blows back, you'll also notice that the hammer is moulded as well and does not pull back. It simply disappears into the slide as it blows back. The slide itself does not blow all the way back like as regular gas blowback pistol. The photo on the right shows the slide all the way back (about half the distance of gas pistols). It also doesn't lock back on the last shot (we had to tape it back for the photo). You also do not need to pull the slide to chamber the first round. Simply slam in the magazine and pull the trigger to get your first round off! Power is a little less than that of a spring pistol and the hop-up sails the BB's slowly through the air. We were only able to penetrate 2 pages of a magazine with a 0.2g BB. The M9 comes with 0.12g BBs but owners will soon notice that 0.12g BBs sail upwards shortly after leaving the barrel - our tests indicate that 0.2g BB's perform the best. Accuracy is fair with 2inch groupings at 15 feet though the sights are quite well aligned.

We've said before that shooting the electric pistol feels a little like a staple gun. Well it still does and a more appropriate name for it might be "Electric Slide Back" rather than "Electric Blowback". However, we do find the gun quite an interesting concept and having a loaded one lying around the house for spontaneous plinking does beat having to charge up a gas pistol everytime you feel like shooting the neighbors dog (just kidding!). The M9 is the first in the lineup and other models will follow shortly. Bottom line is don't compare it with a gas blowback but rather, compare it to a springer and you'll be pleasantly surprised!

As the batteries wear down, the blowback action is noticeably slowed to the point it's almost laughable! Since the batteries take up the majority of space in the butt of the gun, the M9 is forced to use a stick type magazine that holds 15 rounds. The stick type magazine is removed by simply pulling it out. The magazine release button serves no function, unlike the M9's spring counterpart. BB's are loaded by simply pushing them into the top of the magazine. The magazine itself is constructed of dark see-through plastic which allows you to check how many rounds you have left at any time. One annoying thing though is that everytime you pull the magazine out before the gun is emptied, a BB always free falls out of the magazine well. Shooting the M9 is quite an interesting experience.

Readers comparing the electric M9 to a spring gun will be quite happy with the semi-automatic nature and you can squeeze rounds off fairly quickly, though not as quickly as you can pull the trigger. If you try to squeeze the trigger repeatedly fast enough, you can outpace the slide cycle and get less than what you had hoped. While the M9 doesn't have a normal safety, it does provide an alternative in the form of a switch located underneath the trigger guard. To fire the gun, you need to squeeze the safety lever and the trigger at the same time. As the gun blows back, you'll also notice that the hammer is moulded as well and does not pull back. It simply disappears into the slide as it blows back. The slide itself does not blow all the way back like as regular gas blowback pistol. The photo on the right shows the slide all the way back (about half the distance of gas pistols). It also doesn't lock back on the last shot (we had to tape it back for the photo). You also do not need to pull the slide to chamber the first round. Simply slam in the magazine and pull the trigger to get your first round off! Power is a little less than that of a spring pistol and the hop-up sails the BB's slowly through the air. We were only able to penetrate 2 pages of a magazine with a 0.2g BB. The M9 comes with 0.12g BBs but owners will soon notice that 0.12g BBs sail upwards shortly after leaving the barrel - our tests indicate that 0.2g BB's perform the best. Accuracy is fair with 2inch groupings at 15 feet though the sights are quite well aligned.

We've said before that shooting the electric pistol feels a little like a staple gun. Well it still does and a more appropriate name for it might be "Electric Slide Back" rather than "Electric Blowback". However, we do find the gun quite an interesting concept and having a loaded one lying around the house for spontaneous plinking does beat having to charge up a gas pistol everytime you feel like shooting the neighbors dog (just kidding!). The M9 is the first in the lineup and other models will follow shortly. Bottom line is don't compare it with a gas blowback but rather, compare it to a springer and you'll be pleasantly surprised!


Written by RedWolf
Photos by RedWolf
October 25, 1999

Pick one up for yourself and see! We've put it under the EBB Gun section for now!